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Does Your 2000 Chevy Silverado Have a Loose Serpentine Belt: Don’t Risk the Drive, Learn to Fix It Today

Hey there Chevy Silverado owners, have you noticed any concerning squealing or chirping coming from under the hood of your 2000 model truck lately? That’s often the telltale sign that your serpentine belt is on its way out. Don’t fret though, with a few basic tools and this handy guide, you can have that new 6K950 belt installed in no time. No need to let a failing belt strand you or have the dealership charge an arm and a leg for the repair!

What a Serpentine Belt Is and How It Works

The serpentine belt is that long, winding belt under the hood that loops around all your engine’s accessories like the alternator, power steering pump, and AC compressor. It transfers rotational force from the crankshaft to operate these systems. Without it, none of those components will work and you’ll be going nowhere fast. The belt is made of rubber reinforced with tough fiber cords. Over time it can become cracked or frayed from heat, dirt, and simple wear and tear. That’s when it starts to slip or make noise. Replacing it before it fails completely is key to avoiding being stuck on the side of the road.

For the 2000 Silverado, GM uses their 6K950 serpentine belt design which has a specific length and width to fit this application. You can’t just use any ordinary serpentine belt or you won’t get the proper fit. Using the wrong belt is risky as it can come loose or get chewed up by pulleys. Stick with the OEM part number to be sure it meshes with your Silverado’s accessories properly.

Signs Your 2000 Silverado’s Serpentine Belt May Be Failing

Does Your 2000 Chevy Silverado Have a Loose Serpentine Belt: Don

How can you tell when it’s time to swap that worn belt for a new 6K950 in your 2000 Silverado? Here are some common symptoms that your serpentine belt needs replacing:

  • Squealing or chirping noise when starting up or accelerating
  • Visible cracks, fraying, or missing chunks of the belt
  • The belt slips and accessories stop working
  • You see traces of belt rubber residue on pulleys
  • Frayed threads poking out from belt edges
  • Coolant or power steering fluid leaks from worn pump seals

Catching these warning signs early and swapping in that new 6K950 belt promptly can save you from getting stranded or needing costly repairs down the road. Don’t wait until it snaps unexpectedly – be proactive!

What Happens When the 6K950 Belt Breaks Down Completely

Once your 2000 Silverado’s aging 6K950 serpentine belt finally does give out, you’ll immediately notice a lack of power to essential engine systems, including:

  • Dead battery from no alternator charging
  • Difficult steering without power assist
  • AC not blowing cold air
  • Overheating engine from no coolant circulation

Losing power steering and being unable to charge your battery are bad enough when out and about. But overheating or AC failure can leave you sweating it out in summer weather. Avoid getting stranded with a sudden serpentine belt failure by being vigilant and replacing it at the first signs of wear. The slight time and cost of a preemptive repair is nothing compared to a full breakdown away from home.

Tools You’ll Need to Replace the Belt Yourself

Does Your 2000 Chevy Silverado Have a Loose Serpentine Belt: Don

With a Haynes repair manual, basic hand tools, and a little mechanical know-how, you can swap that worn 6K950 serpentine belt in your 2000 Silverado right in your own garage or driveway. Here’s a quick list of what you’ll need on hand:

  • Socket set and ratchet
  • Wrenches for accessory bolts
  • Pliers
  • Screwdrivers
  • New 6K950 belt
  • Gloves
  • Rags
  • WD40 or belt dressing

Don’t be intimidated if you’ve never done this repair before – with some patience and the help of a shop manual, you can definitely handle it yourself. The satisfaction of saving money and keeping your Chevy truck running with your own two hands is priceless!

Now that you’ve got the basic idea of what a serpentine belt is, why it fails, and what you’ll need to work on it, let’s get into the nitty gritty of how to actually replace that aging 6K950 belt in your 2000 Silverado…

Locating the Serpentine Belt on a 2000 Silverado Under the Hood

Pop the hood on your 2000 Silverado and prop it open. Now peer down at the front of the engine and you’ll spot that winding serpentine belt looping around all the pulleys. It’s probably looking pretty cracked and worn about now if you’re replacing it. The 6K950 belt design routes in a figure-8 pattern around the accessory pulleys starting from the crankshaft pulley down low on the passenger side.

Follow the belt’s path to locate the idler pulley and tensioner pulley. The tensioner is an adjustable arm that keeps the belt taut. You’ll need to swing the tensioner to loosen the belt in order to slip the new one on. Refer to your Haynes manual diagrams to be clear on the routing before you begin removal. Having the pattern down will make installation much smoother.

Step-by-Step Instructions to Remove the Old Belt

With the hood open and diagram in hand, you’re ready to tackle swapping that aging 6K950 serpentine belt. Work slowly and methodically. Rushing leads to mistakes or injury:

  1. Spray belt fittings and hardware with WD40 or rubber cleaner
  2. Visually check entire belt for damage and wear spots
  3. Locate tensioner pulley and idler pulley
  4. Use socket or wrench to swing tensioner and loosen belt
  5. With belt loose, slip it off pulleys and remove
  6. Double check diagram for new belt routing
  7. Wipe any grime or old belt residue from pulleys

Pat yourself on the back – you just removed that worn-out 6K950 serpentine belt! Now the easy part is installing the new one…

Aligning the New 6K950 Belt Correctly

Does Your 2000 Chevy Silverado Have a Loose Serpentine Belt: Don

With the old belt out of the way, it’s time to fit on the new Gates, Dayco or AC Delco 6K950 replacement belt. Here’s how to position it correctly:

  1. Loop new belt around pulleys except tensioner
  2. Route following diagram in figure-8 pattern
  3. Ensure belt is centered on pulley grooves
  4. Swing tensioner to draw belt taut
  5. Confirm belt is seated properly on all pulleys
  6. Spin pulleys by hand and check for alignment

It can take some fiddling to get the new belt following the right path. Go slowly and double-check the diagram as needed. The key is getting it centered on all pulley grooves before tightening it up.

Tightening the Belt to the Proper Tension

Now that your new 6K950 serpentine belt is routed correctly, it’s crucial to tighten it to the factory spec tension. Here’s how to get it adjusted just right:

  1. Use wrench to tighten tensioner until taut
  2. Press firmly on belt while tightening to set tension
  3. Rotate pulleys by hand to test for tightness
  4. Belt should have less than 1/2 inch deflection when pressed
  5. Err on the side of tighter – loose belts will slip
  6. Double-check tensioner bolt is tightened firmly

Having the belt too loose is just as bad as over-tightening it. Strive for that firm, snug fit where the belt doesn’t deflect much side-to-side. Tighten and test until you’re confident with the tension. Recheck your work to be sure all hardware is secured.

Starting the Truck and Testing for Issues

Does Your 2000 Chevy Silverado Have a Loose Serpentine Belt: Don

This is the moment of truth after all your hard serpentine belt work. Go back under the hood and put your ear close to the belt with the engine running. Listen for:

  • No squealing or chirping sounds
  • Smooth operation of accessories
  • No visible wobbling or vibration
  • Belt stays centered during acceleration

If the new 6K950 belt passes all those tests, congratulations – you just saved yourself a mechanic’s bill! Be sure to look it over carefully after a few days driving to spot any potential issues cropping up down the road. But for now bask in the glory of doing it yourself.

When to Call a Mechanic for Serpentine Belt Replacement

While most driveway shadetree mechanics can handle swapping a simple serpentine belt, it’s smart to defer to a professional mechanic if:

  • You don’t have the proper tools
  • The belt tensioner seems damaged
  • Adjusting the tensioner seems beyond your skill level
  • You are unsure of the routing diagram
  • An accessory pulley is seized up or damaged

A seasoned mechanic can quickly diagnose underlying issues and has specialized tools that make the job easier. If tackling it yourself seems daunting, there’s no shame in having a shop handle it instead.

But hopefully this overview gives you the confidence to DIY replace that aging 6K950 serpentine belt in your 2000 Chevy Silverado. Just work slowly, follow the diagram, get the tension right, and you’ll have that truck humming again. Let me know in the comments if you found these tips helpful or have your own advice to share with fellow Silverado owners.

Hey Chevy owners, is your 2000 Silverado’s serpentine belt on its last legs? That squeal coming from under the hood is a dead giveaway. Don’t wait until it leaves you stranded – a new 6K950 belt can have you back on the road in no time. With a few basic tools and these step-by-step instructions, you can handle this repair yourself and save some hard-earned cash. It may look daunting, but we’ll walk you through replacing that pesky serpentine belt on your dependable old workhorse.

What a Serpentine Belt Is and How It Works

First, let’s chat about what that serpentine belt actually does. It’s a long, rubberized belt that loops around various pulleys to drive essential systems like the alternator, power steering, and AC compressor. The crankshaft spins it, and the friction turns all those accessories. No belt means none of those components will function. Over time, heat, dirt, and wear cause it to crack and squeal, signaling it’s time for a replacement. Be sure to use the factory 6K950 belt designed specifically for the 2000 Silverado to avoid issues.

Signs Your 2000 Silverado’s Serpentine Belt May Be Failing

If you notice any of these symptoms, your 6K950 belt is on borrowed time:

  • High-pitched squealing, especially at start up or acceleration
  • Visible cracks in the belt or missing chunks
  • The accessories stop spinning as the belt slips
  • You see traces of rubber on the pulleys from belt shredding
  • Frayed threads protruding from the belt’s edges
  • Fluid leaks from worn pump seals

Don’t ignore these warnings – a worn belt can leave you stranded if it snaps unexpectedly. Be proactive and replace it at the first sign of issues to avoid a breakdown down the road.

What Happens When the Belt Finally Breaks

Does Your 2000 Chevy Silverado Have a Loose Serpentine Belt: Don

Once your Silverado’s aging 6K950 belt does finally give out, you’ll quickly notice loss of:

  • Battery charging from a dead alternator
  • Power steering assist making turning extra tough
  • AC blowing hot air instead of cold
  • Engine overheating without coolant circulation

Losing driveability is bad enough, but overheating or no AC can make for some miserable rides in summertime. Stay ahead of a sudden failure by inspecting that belt regularly and replacing it at the first sign of issues.

Tools You’ll Need for a DIY Replacement

With some basic tools, mechanical know-how, and this tutorial, you can swap that aging 6K950 serpentine belt in your own driveway. Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Socket set with ratchet
  • Wrenches to loosen accessory bolts
  • Pliers
  • Screwdrivers
  • New Gates or Dayco 6K950 belt
  • Gloves
  • Rags
  • WD40 or belt dressing

Don’t psych yourself out – with a little time and patience, you can definitely handle this repair yourself. Let’s dive in and get that new belt installed…

Locating the Belt and Pulleys

Does Your 2000 Chevy Silverado Have a Loose Serpentine Belt: Don

Pop the hood and locate the serpentine belt routing around all the pulleys. It follows a figure-8 pattern starting from the crankshaft pulley on the passenger side. Take note of the tensioner pulley and idler pulley locations. You’ll need to swing the tensioner to release belt tension for removal. Consult a diagram to understand the routing before starting.

Removing the Old 6K950 Belt

Ready to swap that noisy belt? Work slowly and methodically:

  1. Spray down fittings with WD40 or belt cleaner
  2. Inspect for damage spots or chunks missing
  3. Locate the tensioner and idler pulleys
  4. Use a socket to swing the tensioner and loosen belt
  5. With tension released, slip belt off pulleys
  6. Double check new belt routing before installing
  7. Wipe any grime off the pulleys

Nice work! With the old belt out, you’re ready for the new 6K950…

The key steps when fitting the new belt are getting the routing right and tensioning it correctly. I’ll walk you through it. Let me know in the comments if you have any other tips for smooth serpentine belt replacement on a 2000 Silverado!

Alright Chevrolet fans, we’ve covered why that serpentine belt on your 2000 Silverado might be squealing, what you’ll need to replace it, and how to track down its routing under the hood. Now let’s get into what happens if that temperamental 6K950 belt leaves you high and dry.

What a Serpentine Belt Is and How It Works

First, a quick refresher. The serpentine belt is a rubberized loop that transfers rotation from the crankshaft to various accessories like the alternator, power steering pump, AC compressor and more. It winds around pulleys to drive each component. Without it spinning properly, none of those systems will operate.

Signs Your 2000 Silverado’s Serpentine Belt May Be Failing

Be on the lookout for these common indicators that your 6K950 belt needs attention:

  • Squealing or chirping, especially on startup
  • Visible cracking or missing chunks of belt
  • Accessories stop working as belt slips
  • Belt residue on pulleys from fraying
  • Frayed threads protruding along the edges
  • Leaks from worn pump seals

Addressing these early warning signs promptly can help avoid a full breakdown down the road.

What Happens When the 6K950 Belt Breaks Down Completely

When your worn 6K950 serpentine belt finally snaps or comes totally loose, you’ll quickly lose operation of:

  • Alternator – no battery charging means dead in the water
  • Power steering – much harder to maneuver without assist
  • AC system – no cold air on hot days
  • Coolant pump – risk of overheating without circulation

Losing power steering or a dead battery alone can ruin your day. But overheating or AC failure takes it to another level, especially in summer weather. Don’t get caught off guard – inspect that aging belt often and replace at the first sign of wear.

Tools You’ll Need for DIY Replacement

Does Your 2000 Chevy Silverado Have a Loose Serpentine Belt: Don

With some basic tools and skills, you can replace that 6K950 belt yourself, including:

  • Socket set with ratchet
  • Wrenches for accessory bolts
  • Pliers
  • Screwdrivers
  • New Gates or Dayco OEM belt
  • Gloves and rags
  • WD40 or belt dressing

Take your time, follow factory routing diagrams, get the tension right, and you can avoid paying a mechanic. Let’s walk through the key steps…

Locating the Belt Path

Pop the hood and find the serpentine belt’s figure-8 routing pattern. Note the locations of the tensioner and idler pulleys you’ll need to work with.

Removing the Old Belt

Releasing tension and sliding off the old belt is fairly straightforward:

  1. Spray belt and hardware with WD40 or cleaner
  2. Visually inspect for damage spots
  3. Use wrench/socket to swing tensioner and release tension
  4. With tension off, slip belt off pulleys
  5. Consult diagram for new belt routing before installing
  6. Wipe grime off pulleys

We’re halfway there! Now it’s time to walk through fitting the new 6K950 belt onto your 2000 Silverado…

Silverado owners, we’ve gone over why that factory 6K950 serpentine belt fails, signs it needs replacing, and what happens if it breaks. Now let’s talk about the tools and skills needed to swap it yourself and save some dough.

What a Serpentine Belt Is and How It Works

Does Your 2000 Chevy Silverado Have a Loose Serpentine Belt: Don

The serpentine belt is a rubberized loop that transfers rotation from the crank pulley to run accessories like the alternator, power steering, AC, and more. It winds around various pulleys to drive each component. No spinning belt means none of those systems will work.

Signs Your 2000 Silverado’s Serpentine Belt May Be Failing

Watch for these symptoms that indicate belt replacement is needed:

  • Squealing, chirping sounds, especially on startup
  • Visible cracks or missing chunks of belt
  • Slippage causing accessories to stop spinning
  • Belt residue on pulleys from fraying
  • Frayed threads along the belt edges
  • Fluid leaks from worn pump seals

What Happens When the 6K950 Belt Breaks Down Completely

When that aging belt finally snaps, you immediately lose:

  • Alternator charging leaving battery dead
  • Power steering assist making turning very difficult
  • AC blowing hot air instead of cold
  • Engine coolant circulation risking overheat

Tools You’ll Need to Replace the Belt Yourself

With some basic tools and skills, you can replace that 6K950 belt yourself, including:

  • Socket set with ratchet wrench
  • Wrenches to loosen accessory bolts
  • Pliers
  • Screwdrivers
  • New Gates or Dayco OEM belt
  • Gloves and rags
  • WD40 or belt dressing

Seem intimidating? Don’t worry, taking your time and following instructions, you can definitely do this at home. Paying a shop is avoidable!

Locating the Belt’s Routing

Open the hood and find the belt’s figure-8 path around pulleys. Note the tensioner and idler locations you’ll be working with.

Removing the Old Belt

Releasing tension and sliding off the old belt takes patience but isn’t too tough:

  1. Spray belt and hardware with WD40 or rubber cleaner
  2. Inspect for damage spots and wear
  3. Use wrench to swing tensioner and release tension
  4. With tension off, slip belt off pulleys
  5. Consult diagram for new routing before installing
  6. Wipe any grime off pulleys

We’re halfway there! Now let’s walk through fitting the new 6K950 belt…

Alright Silverado owners, by now you should understand why that OEM 6K950 serpentine belt needs replacing on your 2000 model truck. You know the symptoms of a failing belt, consequences if it breaks, and tools needed to swap in a new one yourself. Now let’s talk about locating the belt routing under the hood.

What a Serpentine Belt Is and How It Works

Does Your 2000 Chevy Silverado Have a Loose Serpentine Belt: Don

The serpentine belt is a rubberized loop that transfers rotation from the crankshaft pulley to various accessories like the alternator, power steering pump, AC compressor and more. It loops around pulleys to drive each component.

Signs Your 2000 Silverado’s Serpentine Belt May Be Failing

Be on the lookout for these signs of a failing belt:

  • Squealing or chirping noises, especially at startup
  • Visible cracks or missing chunks of belt
  • Accessories stopping as belt slips
  • Belt residue on pulleys from fraying
  • Frayed threads protruding along edges
  • Fluid leaks from worn pump seals

What Happens When the Belt Breaks Completely

When that 6K950 belt snaps, you’ll lose:

  • Battery charging from a dead alternator
  • Power steering assist making turning very hard
  • AC blowing only hot air
  • Engine overheating risk without coolant circulation

Tools You’ll Need to Replace the Belt Yourself

Does Your 2000 Chevy Silverado Have a Loose Serpentine Belt: Don

With some basic tools and skills, you can tackle this belt replacement yourself:

  • Socket set with ratchet
  • Wrenches to loosen accessory bolts
  • Pliers
  • Screwdrivers
  • New Gates or Dayco OEM belt
  • Gloves and rags
  • WD40 or belt dressing

Locating the Serpentine Belt on a 2000 Silverado Under the Hood

Pop the hood and look down at the front of the engine to spot the winding serpentine belt looped around various pulleys. It follows a figure-8 pattern starting from the crankshaft pulley on the passenger side. Follow the belt’s path to identify the locations of the tensioner pulley and idler pulley you’ll be working with. Refer to your Haynes manual diagrams to understand the exact routing before beginning removal. Having the pattern clear in your head makes installation much smoother.

Removing the Old Belt Step-by-Step

Okay, you’ve got eyes on that aging 6K950 belt and know how it routes around the pulleys. Now let’s walk through the steps to remove it:

  1. Spray belt fittings and hardware with WD40 or rubber cleaner
  2. Visually inspect belt for damage spots and wear
  3. Locate tensioner and idler pulleys
  4. Use wrench to swing tensioner and release belt tension
  5. With tension off, slip belt off pulleys and remove
  6. Consult diagram for new belt routing before installing
  7. Wipe any grime or old belt residue off pulleys

Belt removal is done – great work! Now we just need to walk through fitting the new 6K950 belt onto your Silverado…

Silverado owners, we’ve covered the purpose of the serpentine belt, signs it’s failing, consequences of breakage, and tools needed for DIY replacement on your 2000 model truck. You also know how to locate the 6K950 belt routing under the hood. Now let’s focus on actually removing that old worn-out belt.

What a Serpentine Belt Is and How It Works

The serpentine belt is a rubberized loop that transfers rotation from the crankshaft pulley to various accessories like the alternator, power steering pump, AC compressor and more. It loops around pulleys to drive each component.

Signs Your 2000 Silverado’s Serpentine Belt May Be Failing

Watch for these common signs of belt failure:

  • Squealing or chirping noises, especially on startup
  • Visible cracking or missing chunks of belt
  • Accessories stopping as belt slips
  • Belt residue on pulleys from fraying
  • Frayed threads along the edges
  • Fluid leaks from worn seals

Consequences of Complete 6K950 Belt Breakage

If that belt snaps, you’ll lose:

  • Battery charging from a dead alternator
  • Power steering assist making turning very hard
  • AC blowing only hot air
  • Engine overheating risk without coolant circulation

Step-by-Step Instructions to Remove the Old Belt

Does Your 2000 Chevy Silverado Have a Loose Serpentine Belt: Don

Okay, you’ve located the belt routing under the hood. Now let’s walk through the old belt removal process:

  1. Spray belt fittings and hardware with WD40 or rubber cleaner
  2. Visually inspect for damage spots and wear
  3. Locate the tensioner and idler pulleys
  4. Use wrench to swing tensioner and release belt tension
  5. With tension released, slip belt off pulleys and remove
  6. Consult diagram for new belt routing before installing
  7. Wipe off any grime or old belt residue from pulleys

Belt removal complete! Wasn’t so bad right? Now we just need to focus on fitting the new 6K950 belt onto your 2000 Silverado correctly. I’ll walk through aligning it properly, setting tension, and testing that it works smoothly.

Let me know in the comments if you run into any hiccups during old belt removal on your truck! Happy to provide any tips to get that aging belt off and new one running.

Alright Silverado owners, we’re making progress. You’ve located that aging 6K950 serpentine belt under the hood and successfully removed it. Now it’s time for the fun part – fitting the new belt correctly.

What a Serpentine Belt Does

Does Your 2000 Chevy Silverado Have a Loose Serpentine Belt: Don

The serpentine belt transfers rotation from the crankshaft to accessories like the alternator, power steering, AC compressor, etc. It loops around various pulleys to drive each component.

Signs Your Belt is Failing

Watch for these symptoms of a failing belt:

  • Squealing or chirping noises
  • Visible cracking or missing chunks
  • Accessories stopping as belt slips
  • Belt residue on pulleys from fraying
  • Frayed threads along the edges
  • Fluid leaks from worn seals

Consequences of Complete Belt Breakage

If the belt snaps you’ll lose:

  • Battery charging from dead alternator
  • Power steering assist
  • AC blowing hot air
  • Engine overheating risk

Aligning the New 6K950 Belt Correctly

With the old belt removed, fitting the new one takes precision:

  1. Loop new belt around all pulleys except tensioner
  2. Ensure routing matches diagram’s figure-8 pattern
  3. Confirm belt is centered on pulley grooves
  4. Swing tensioner to draw belt taut
  5. Double check seating on all pulleys
  6. Spin pulleys by hand and check alignment

It can take some trial and error to get the routing right. Refer to the diagram as needed. Centering it on the pulleys before tightening is key.

Next we’ll discuss how to tension that new 6K950 belt just right. Let me know if you have any other tips for smoothly fitting a new serpentine belt!

Silverado owners, we’re making real progress. You’ve located the serpentine belt, removed the old one, and aligned the new 6K950 belt on the pulleys. Now we need to dial in the proper tension – extremely important for smooth operation and belt life.

What a Serpentine Belt Does

The serpentine belt transfers rotation from the crankshaft to various accessories via pulleys – think alternator, power steering, AC compressor, etc.

Signs of a Failing Belt

Be on the lookout for:

  • Squealing or chirping noises
  • Visible cracking or missing chunks
  • Accessories stopping as belt slips
  • Belt residue on pulleys from fraying
  • Frayed threads along the edges
  • Fluid leaks from worn seals

Consequences of Complete Breakage

If the belt snaps you’ll lose:

  • Battery charging from dead alternator
  • Power steering assist
  • AC blowing only hot air
  • Engine overheating risk

Tightening the Belt to the Proper Tension

With the new 6K950 belt aligned correctly, dialing in proper tension is crucial:

  1. Use wrench to tighten tensioner until belt is taut
  2. Press firmly on belt while tightening to set tension
  3. Rotate pulleys by hand to test tightness
  4. Belt should have less than 1/2 inch deflection when pressed
  5. Err toward tighter tension – loose belts will slip
  6. Confirm tensioner bolt is tightened firmly

Too loose and the belt may slip and fail. Too tight and it strains components. Strive for that firm, snug fit with minimal deflection.

Next we’ll go over starting and testing that new belt for smooth operation. Let me know if you have any other serpentine belt tensioning tips!

Silverado owners, we’re in the home stretch! You’ve located, removed, and replaced that aging 6K950 serpentine belt, aligning and tensioning the new one correctly. Now it’s time for the moment of truth – firing up the engine and testing operation.

What the Serpentine Belt Does

Does Your 2000 Chevy Silverado Have a Loose Serpentine Belt: Don

The serpentine belt transfers rotation from the crankshaft to various accessories via pulleys – think alternator, power steering, AC, etc.

Signs of a Failing Belt

Watch for:

  • Squealing or chirping noises
  • Visible cracking or missing chunks
  • Accessories stopping as belt slips
  • Belt residue on pulleys from fraying
  • Frayed threads along the edges
  • Fluid leaks from worn seals

Consequences of Complete Breakage

If the belt snaps you’ll lose:

  • Battery charging from dead alternator
  • Power steering assist
  • AC blowing only hot air
  • Engine overheating risk

Starting the Truck and Testing for Issues

Fire up the engine and listen closely to the new belt for:

  • No squealing or chirping sounds
  • Smooth operation of accessories
  • No visible wobbling or vibration
  • Belt stays centered during acceleration

If it passes these tests without issues, congratulations – you successfully replaced your Silverado’s 6K950 serpentine belt! Inspect it again after a few days of driving to spot any potential problems down the road.

With some care and patience, you just saved yourself a mechanic’s bill. Let me know if you found these DIY steps helpful or if you have any other tips for fellow Silverado owners. Happy motoring!

Chevy owners, we covered a lot of ground here. You now know how to locate, remove and replace that aging 6K950 serpentine belt on your 2000 Silverado, including proper tensioning and testing. While this is definitely a DIY job, here are a few instances where having a professional mechanic tackle it is smart.

What the Serpentine Belt Does

Does Your 2000 Chevy Silverado Have a Loose Serpentine Belt: Don

The serpentine belt transfers rotation from the crankshaft to various accessories via pulleys – think alternator, power steering, AC compressor, etc.

Signs of a Failing Belt

Be on the lookout for:

  • Squealing or chirping noises
  • Visible cracking or missing chunks
  • Accessories stopping as belt slips
  • Belt residue on pulleys from fraying
  • Frayed threads along the edges
  • Fluid leaks from worn seals

Consequences of Complete Breakage

If the belt snaps you’ll lose:

  • Battery charging from dead alternator
  • Power steering assist
  • AC blowing only hot air
  • Engine overheating risk

When to Call a Mechanic for Serpentine Belt Replacement

While a DIY job, consider a professional mechanic if:

  • You lack the proper tools
  • The tensioner seems damaged
  • Adjusting the tensioner seems too complex
  • You’re unsure of the routing diagram
  • A pulley is seized up or damaged

A seasoned mechanic has specialized tools and experience making the job smoother. If tackling it yourself seems daunting, no shame in paying for peace of mind!

Hopefully these steps give you the know-how and confidence for a DIY serpentine belt replacement on your 2000 Silverado. Let me know if you have any other tips for fellow Chevy owners down in the comments!